Editing Fonts

Font Editors

There are many people who couldn’t give a damn about how their documents appear, they just want to get the message across and don’t care what it looks like.  This is why Times New Roman and Arial are so overused.

Most of these people ignore the excellent typefaces like Constantia, Cambria, Corbel, Candara, Calibri and Consolas which Microsoft have spent a lot of time and effort optimising for good rendering on LCD screens at small point sizes (they also work quite well in printed documents).

I am not one of those people.

Then there are others who want their document to look just the way they want it to, they don’t want to compromise on any detail including the typeface.  They usually have a large collection of fonts none of which they consider perfect.  These are the type of people who are likely to know how to use Open Type features in their documents.

I am one of these people.

I believe there are many people in the situation I was in several years ago, they would like to create their own typeface if they could, or at least alter a typeface they are using to make it more suitable for them.

There were many occasions when I would hunt through my collection of typefaces looking for the one which was just right.  One which had all the right features.  But I became frustrated that none of the typefaces in my collection were completely suitable for the purposes I wanted them for.

It’s all very subjective, but if you want a typeface which is just right for you then why not design it yourself ?

Free Font Editors

As you may have realised from reading this blog I am a fan of free software.  But only where it provides a good usable alternative to commercial software.

There is a free open source font editor called ‘Font Forge‘ however it does have many bugs and the user interface is quite messy.  It can produce good fonts but using Font Forge is much harder work than it needs to be, oh well, at least it’s free.

I used Font Forge for eight months before buying Font Creator.  Font Forge is complicated to use, it opens many independent windows on your monitors and there are many bugs.  When I bought Font Creator editing fonts suddenly became a whole lot easier.

I wish that the open source offering was of a higher quality but unfortunately it is not.

Non Free Font Editors

There are a few commercial Font Editors.  There aren’t as many for Windows as for the Mac but since I only have a Windows computer I have not concerned myself with any of the Mac editors.

High Logic

High Logic is a Dutch company run by Erwin Dennisen.  They produce several font related programs but Font Creator the font editor is their main flagship product.

I use Font Creator, however I have no connection to the High Logic or Erwin Dennisen other than being a user of their products.

Font Creator

There is a full review of Font Creator on Bhikkhu Pesala’s website which also contains his excellent collection of fonts which are free to download and use !

Font Creator is a moderately priced font editor which does most of the things which the very expensive font editors do.  You can edit and create fonts in Postscript (with CFF cubic curves) format and true type/open type fonts using quadratic curves.  It also supports Web Open Font Format (WOFF and WOFF2) and colour fonts.

The ‘Visual OpenType Designer’ for adding or editing open type features is better than the equivalent open type editor on any of the more expensive font editors in my opinion.

At the time of writing the Home edition of Font Creator costs $79.  This version has some restrictions however.  Union and Intersection of contours is not included in this version, also the batch transformation of glyphs is not included.  This version doesn’t have automatic composition of composite characters either.

The more expensive version of Font Creator (Standard) has many features like real time validation and a more thorough validation which can be run to identify and correct errors in your font.

The Standard edition can also automatically Kern your font and of course you can still do the kerning manually if you want.

There is a comparison of the editions on the High Logic website.

At the time of writing the Standard edition of Font Creator costs $149 however this price is set to increase to $199 on 28th September 2018.  The Standard edition has all of the features except for Optical Metrics (setting the spacing of your characters so that text appears to be evenly spaced on the page).

Optical Metrics is useful but not essential and the price jump between the Standard edition and the Professional edition of Font Creator has become quite large.

Even if you know nothing about spacing characters it isn’t rocket science, there is a preview window which can be viewed in which you can display many different strings of characters (including your own strings) and the display adjusts as you alter the spacing of a character.  Just adjust them until they look correct.

Preview Window

The preview window showing a selection of Cherokee characters from the upcoming Munson v2.0 to be released ‘real soon now’.  As you can see these are not correctly spaced yet.

If you want to go a little deeper then get a good book on typography like ‘Letters of Credit’ by Walter Tracey or ‘Optical Character Spacing’ by David Kindersley then you will be able to set the spacing manually without too much trouble, trust your eyes, if it looks right then it’s right.

However I must admit it does save a lot of work to just let the computer do it.

At the time of writing the Professional edition of Font Creator costs $199 however this price is set to increase to $299 on 28th September 2018.  Three hundred dollars is a lot of money, the price has increased a lot since I bought my copy several years ago, this is disappointing as it is getting to be a comparable price to some of the Font Labs editors.  I’m glad that I have kept my license updated to the latest version.


Edit :- Apparently the discounts on the standard and professional editions of Font Creator are ongoing.  Once the deadline runs out it just renews with a new deadline.  This is probably to persuade people to buy now rather than later.  The price of the professional edition of Font Creator has been $199 since 2009, ten years at the same price probably means it will actually increase in price in the near future.


As you might expect the Professional edition has all features enabled.

Overview Window

The overview window showing the Cyrillic characters (itallic) from Munson v2.0

The font overview window is what you see when you first run the program and create a new font or open a font for editing. It displays a view of all the glyphs in the font although you can view a subset of glyphs, for instance a Unicode block or all punctuation or after doing a validation of your font you can display all the glyphs identified as having potential problems.  Double click on a glyph to edit it.

Edit window

The glyph edit window. Toolbars can be placed anywhere round the window and can even be floating.

The glyph edit window is where you edit a single glyph.  Either using cubic (CFF) curves or quadratic (TTF) curves.  You can add shapes, add points or draw freehand to create a glyph.

Open Type Designer

Open Type Designer showing the placement of an anchor used to position diacritic marks relative to a character.

The Open Type designer is an easy way to add and edit open type features to a font.  Although it is complex it is much simpler than editing the code manually although you can still edit the code if you really want to.  In most cases the results of your changes are illustrated in the dialog box so you can see what is happening.

Code Editor

You can also edit the code manually if you want to.

Font Labs

There is an American company called Font Labs which produces font editors amongst other things.  Apart from one (Type Tool) the editors they produce are quite good but very expensive.  Expensive enough to discourage someone who is only mildly interested in producing their own font.

Type Tool

Type Tool is the cheapest font editor that Font Labs produce. The facilities it offers are very basic, so basic that it is not useful for producing anything but the simplest of fonts with no open type features.

At the time of writing Type Tool is being sold at $47.99 which may seem cheap but for that price you don’t get very much.

Why would Font Labs produce such a limited editor ?  They don’t want their customers to see it as a viable alternative to their more expensive editors.

Fontographer

Fontographer is a font editor designed for graphic designers. It is a very competent editor but doesn’t do Open Type features.  Apart from the fact that it doesn’t do Open Type features the interface and features seem somewhat similar to Font Creator.

At the time of writing Fontographer is being sold at $259.

Although the drawing tools are very good the editor is limited in what it can produce.  Open Type features are being supported by more and more software as time passes.  If the font you produce is to be used with a good word processor or desktop publishing program then open type features are important.

I have not used this program but from looking at the available documentation it seems expensive for the features it offers.

FontLab VI

FontLab VI is an extremely competent editor with just about every feature you could want for producing a font.  It does open type features, automatic spacing and kerning.  It has all the facilities which you might need to design fonts.  The user interface is quite complex but the job it is doing is complex so this is perhaps understandable.

At the time of writing FontLab VI is being sold at $459 which in my opinion is quite expensive for what you get.

I have used a trial version of this program and it seemed complicated to use.  Perhaps the user interface would become more comprehensible with time but I didn’t want to spend the money to get a license when I already have a perfectly good program for this purpose.

FontLab Studio 5

At the time of writing FontLab Studio 5 is being sold at $649.

I cannot pass any comments on this program because I have not used it or read the documentation.

Other Companies

There are a few other offerings for those who want to produce a font.

Like DTL FontTools and Letter Modeller or TruFont or even FontArk.

Please note I have only taken a quick look at some of these.  DTL FontTools seems like a commercial editor, Letter Modeller and TruFont seem like they might be free and FontArk is online and runs in your browser.

Conclusions

If I was in the position of wanting a font editor and knowing what I do now, having used some of the products looked at here (albeit some of them only the trial versions) I would still choose Font Creator.

I cannot recommend the free open source ‘Font Forge’ because it has a messy user interface and there are many bugs.

The editors from Font Labs are very good but also very expensive.  Apart from ‘Type Tool’ which is crippled in it’s functionality to the point where it is not a real alternative.

Font Creator does everything you need to create a professional quality font and in my opinion it offers the best value for money, although the prices have risen quite steeply since I bought my copy several years ago.

 

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